UV-C and SARS CoV-2

Signify today announced that Boston University has determined that a Signify ultraviolet (UV) light source would almost always deactivate the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 if dosed at the right level. The university’s National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) exposed materials containing the virus to a UV-C tube lamp from Signify. It found that a doseContinue reading “UV-C and SARS CoV-2”

Ultraviolet (UV) light is a commonly used method for killing bacteria, but could it help with disinfecting areas contaminated with COVID-19? A breakthrough discovery of a new class of transparent conductors could be the answer.

Two UV infection control methods of killing bacteria currently exist, which use chemicals or ultraviolet radiation exposure as a form of disinfectant, using a 200 to 300 nanometre range. However, in order to kill the COVID-19 virus very high levels of ultraviolet light is required, which can be very costly. Now, researchers from Penn State and the University of Minnesota have used theContinue reading “Ultraviolet (UV) light is a commonly used method for killing bacteria, but could it help with disinfecting areas contaminated with COVID-19? A breakthrough discovery of a new class of transparent conductors could be the answer.”

“Marriott Hotels’ New Cleaning Routine Involves Sanitizing Sprayers and UV Light

Source: Conde Nast Traveler Much news has been made of airlines’ new and improved disinfecting routines—including fogging, or spraying a high-grade disinfectant, throughout the cabin and wiping down high-touch points—and how the coronavirus-induced changes will stick around after the pandemic ends. But few updates have come from hotels, many of whom are open, albeit with significantly fewer guests.Continue reading ““Marriott Hotels’ New Cleaning Routine Involves Sanitizing Sprayers and UV Light”